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special remarks under my special order. tonight's special order is meant to order israel's 65th independence day and yet, first, today's tragedy demands our attention. security officials continue to investigate the details of the incident, i know that all americans join with us today, our thoughts and prayers affected, the victims, their families and the courageous first responders. when acts like this occur, it find it even more important that we carry on and refuse allow our lives to be dictated by those wishing ill. in many ways it is fitic to discuss israel, a nation that are knows all tool well the pain of these tragedies. today, israelis commemorated memorial day to honor the memory of 24,000 israeli men, women and children who have been killed in terror attacks and wars in the past 65 years. immediately following the memorial day, though, israel transitions to independence day when israelis and jews across the globe celebrate the modern-day revival of the state of israel. the abrupt transition from the sadness of memorial day to the joy and celebration of independence day
words. >>> now on booktv dennis bryan talking about the support given to jews and israel by american president. going back many decades. this lasts about an hour. [applause] >>> thank you very much. my publish ear's name is gefan. the headquarter are in jerusalem. when i finished the manuscript to the book, i sent it to allen, hoping he would give a brief comment my publisher could use. instead of which he wrote complete preface on part of it was that he was shocked having read my book. he believed he was widely read in american history and jewish history and yet he found so much in this book that he had no idea about before. incidentally, he's writing his autobiography at the moment, which should be fascinated. i'll be using my notes a lot, i want to make sure i get the facts absolutely right, and i will be leaving the notes behind after after words. anybody who is interested can check up on it. israel's founding fathers, moses and joshua, his second in command, inspiring america's founding fathers to a remarkable degree. like most americans, having been brought up in the bible, the
that the relationship between america and israel has never been stronger. despite this remarkable record, when i was working on this book in 2012, only 8% of israelis thought that obama was pro-israel. after the recent visit in 2013, a poll by israel democracy institute and tel aviv democracy, shows that figure has only increased to 18%. yet, every measure -- pro-israel. i would like to mention the report that accused israel of targeting civilians during its invasion into gaza following constant rocket attacks from gaza on israel. in rebuttal, a former commander of urged forces in afghanistan told you and watch in 2009 quote, during the fighting in gaza, the israeli defense force -- i'm sorry, the quote is now, i'll put it this way. during the fighting in gaza, the israeli defense forces quote, did more to safeguard the rights of civilians in a conflict zone than any other army in the history of warfare. obama's human representative called the report quote unbalanced, one-sided, and basically unacceptable, end quote. goldstone complained that the israeli government did not cooperate with them, a
research, extraordinary relationship with the state of israel, more effectively. dr. khalidi has served as adviser to the palestinian authorities delegation. it was not then the palestinian authority but it was the plo delegation, although not described as such during the ocess, whi ledo the madrid process. he has a ba from yale, ph.d from oxford, he has taught at university beirut, lebanon university, georgetown, columbia, then he went to chicago for eight years as the director of the center for middle east studies. and then he returned to columbia, where he is now the edward said chair for modern arab studies, and he will speak for half an hour, 45 minutes, and then there will be time for questions. so, again, thank you, rashid, for joining us. welcome, and thank you to all of you for coming. [applause] >> well, thank you all for co thank you for the generous introductions. it's always a pleasure to be in our nation's capitol in springtime, especially because april 15th is coming up. it's good to see where all the money is going just before you send in your income tax return, which i
an almost israeli narrative in the entire history of conflict. this speech in israel did th again. you have to read it carefully to realize he's hitting every stop. >> rose: he's head -- >> that's not the way to resolve it. you're not going to resolve it. >> rose: friedman and khalidi when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here. he is a columnist for the "new york times." he's a three-time pulitzer prize winner and the author from beirut to jerusalem first published in 1989, documented his time as a reporter in lebanon israel. recently been updated to reflect the changes in the region caused by the arab awake things. he writes i invite you to read this book to understand the identities, aspirations and passions that endure in the middle east and explore the old forces interacting with the new forces. i'm pleased to have tom friedman back at this table. >> pleasessed to be here charlie, thank you. >> rose: way back when i did an interview with you. also today when i know a friend of m
and extraordinary research and extraordinary relationship with the state of israel more effectively. dr. holiday has served as an adviser to the palestinian authorities delegation, was not then the palestinian authority, but it was -- it was the plo delegation, although, not described as such during the short lived madrid peace process which led to the madrid process. he has a ba from yale, ph.d. from oxford, taught in beirut lebanon university, georgetown, columbia, and went do chicago for eight years for director of the center of middle east studies, and then he returned to columbia where he's now the edward chair for mod earn arab studies, and he will speak for half hour to 45 minutes and time for questions. thank you, welcome, and thank you all for coming. [applause] >> thank you all for those jen royce introductions. it's an honor to be in the nation's capitol in springtime. april 15th's coming up, good to see where the money is going before you send in your income tax return, which i have not yet finished, so i'm going to talk about the book, and i'm going to only touch on a few highlights. i
as a reporter in lebanon israel. recently been updated to reflect the changes in the region caused by the arab awake things. he writes i invite you to read this book to understand the identities, aspirations and passions that endure in the middle east and explore the old forces interacting with the new forces. i'm pleased to have tom friedman back at this table. >> pleasessed to be here charlie, thank you. >> rose: way back when i did an interview with you. also today when i know a friend of mine from wherever they come say i'm going to beirut i say start with this. this is one of the things you ought to go and now it's been updated. you updated it because you wanted to reflect from a foundation the ideas that has been expressed there and how they are interacting with new ideas. >> you know charlie for probably almost 20 years my publisher jonathan used to say to me you should update the book. we did it once after oslo and i said i will update but it will be new forward beirut to uses level, one page one line. nothing has changed. but in the wake of the arab spring somebody very big has chan
if we've been interested in this region. thinking about egypt/israel, the palestinians, syrians. the questions are manyfold, but many of the answers that you'll receive or you'll be able to get a better understanding of was how was it that george w. bush from texas came to the white house with so little experience in the middle east, became so intensely involved with israel and committed to the jewish state? how did it happen? how and why did george w. bush's choice for secretary of state, colin powell, how did his views differ so sharply from the president's? almost from the very beginning. why was it that yasser arafat, who had been invited to the white house so many times, in fact, i think more than any other foreign dignitary during the clinton years, never set foot in the bush white house? how did bush and sharon develop such a trusting relationship? they had really never met. why did condoleezza rice's viewpoint change so abruptly between the first term and the second term of the administration? why and how did sharon decide it was in israel's interests to leave gaza? and
that we all have thought about if we had been interested in this region thinking about egypt and israel, palestinians syrians the questions are manyfold but many answers you will receive is how was it that george to view bush from texas came to the white house with so little experience in the least with israel, and committed to the jewish state. how and why did george w. bush choice of secretary of state colin powell, how does his views differ so sharply from the president's almost from the beginning? why is it that yes -- yasser arafat invited to the warehouse more than any other foreign dignitary during the clinton years years, yet never set foot in the bush white house? how did bush and sure around develop such a trusting relationship? they had never met. why did connolly's a rice viewpoint change so or abruptly between the first term and a second term of the administration? why and how did it sure drone decided is in israel's interest to leave caused the? and if that isn't enough with is the real story behind the syrian nuclear facility? given what has happened since, it is truly ch
. >> my dad was born in israel. his parents had escaped from a nasa. the soviet union, very early on. there were pharmacists. he had an older brother who was substantially older who ended up being killed in 1933 when my dad was a young boy. he was on the periphery of a battle between jews and arabs in jerusalem. a bullet ricocheted off of the street and craze is like. and pretty penicillin. he became infected and ended up dying. not in the book, but he is buried on the mount of olives. for those of you in a jerusalem is on the east side of the old city. no one had seen his grave for years and years. then when we were in israel for my nephew's permits -- but that's up, my daughter and i withheld vote -- help of an arab caretaker, with the help of an arab caretaker who has been taking care of that jewish cemetery for years and years, we after about an hour of searching kind of like in the last scene of the good, bad, and the of the -- ugly, that cemetery spins around and all you can see is a gravestone and we ended up finding it. my father was a survivor. his parents and, you know, the
. president obama's recent visit to israel has renewed hope for resolving the conflict. i'm pleased to have senator george mitchell back at this table to talk about where he sees things today. welcome. >> thank you, charlie, good to be back. >> rose: you just made a speech and and have blilt and you said "i will firmly say that there is no such thing as a conflict that cannot be solved." >> i believe that. i believe that every conflict is created, conducted, sustained by humans and can be ended by humans and ultimately will be ended by humans one way or the other. either through the total victory of one side and the total defeat of the other or by both sides recognizing where that doesn't happen that it is in their mutual interest and stop the fighting and to get together and work out an arrangement whereby they can live side by side and that i believe will happen in the middle east. >> rose: okay, but sometimes foo fatigue sets in, too, doesn't it? >> yes. >> rose: people just simply say "i'm tired of thi" and it happenein ireland. >> it did. rose:nd some parts of the middle east. people a
of the tensions between religion, and the spot we picked on, dare i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our executive producer, hasn't come out and read this e-mail message i sent to him about three days before we're ready to go on this journey. we planned it of course for several months. we're talking about a crew of at least six people- a lot of preparation, and of course, at the time when we were set to go was one of the worst possible times in terms of the tension; you know, again, another flare-up between the
changing weapons to the is systems in lebanon israel will react and we are serious about the red line and sticking about the red line and the people in syria though that. the chemical weapons situation again is very, very complex. this is an american call. the united states and israel are sovereign countries and we have to make our own decisions whether about syria or about the iranian nuclear program. >> here is the issue. not just syria that is watching. iran is watching. president obama said that he would not allow eran to develop a nuke capability which is an intelligence matter. i don't have to tell you is a much more difficult thing to assess than whether or not there has been a use of chemical weapons. if the president backs off as he appears to be from the red line and enormous consequences in syria what do you think of the lesson that is being seen by the mullahs in tehran? >> the chemical threat is serious. but you it is of a typically different magnitude of the iranian nuclear threat which threatens the existences of the state of israel and threatens world stability. the ir
he was unusually sexist. >> he wasn't unusually sexist. >> what was his view of israel? >> he supported the state of israel, but not politically. >> he didn't support it in the beginning, though. >> absolutely not. he did not want to stay. he wanted a cultural place for jews. that was his great affection for the hebrew university also. he wanted a place for jews to be professors. hebrew university is the center piece for his love of palestine as a place for them to find cultural refuge. >> you know he really disliked nationalism. >> yes. >> and that's what he felt israel might develop into. >> he said it quite explicitly. he said it as late as 1946, before the aglo american committee into the state of palestine. this is the committee in which richard crossman was in witcha. the idea a state is hateful to me. two years bere the founding of the state of israel. >> when whitesman died, who offered the presidency to einstein? >> bangurian. wouldn't that have been a disaster. >> there's the famous joke that he said, what do we do if he accepts? but because they considered
and nonproliferation. delegates from the middle east and north africa criticized israel for refusing to hold a meeting. delegates at a treaty review conference agreed to hold the meeting. representatives say israel's boycott is preventing the discussions from taking place. >>> the u.s. defense secretary has announced an arms deal that will strengthen israel's military edge in the middle east. chuck hagel says a package will include transport aircraft and an advanced radar system. he met with the his israeli counterpart. he said israel will buy the b22 osprey plane. israel will also buy an aerial refueling jet. the aircraft would make it easier to conduct long distance raids on iran. israeli leaders have threatened military action to stop iran from developing nuclear weapons. hagel said there's still time for can diplomacy and sanctions. but the arms sale will increase israel's long-range capabilities. he's already enacted the first two. now he's focusing on the third. we are joined from the business desk. gross strategy, doesn't sound like an easy task considering the state of japan's finances. >> jap
department threatens to resign if chairman supports the state of israel ultimately he does come out to support the state of israel and immediately recognizes the state of israel and becomes a hero even though earlier he was criticized to be anti-semitic. i think fdr would have done the same thing he was strong on the establishment of palestine when he was governor he issued a statement saying he supported a jewish homeland in palestine he opposed those with innovation policy and constantly tried go back channels to pressure the british to modify the white paper and spoke out in favor of a jewish homeland at the end of his life, he is gravely ill and traveled to the suez canal to meet with the king of saudi arabia to persuade him to except the jewish state in palestine to offer incentives and got absolutely no where for that and was gravely ill so much he was operating on there of instead of flying back to the u.s. he goes to the conference to meet on pakistan and -- palestine spanish how many were able to get to the west? >> well over 100,000 were able to get out of germany in to th
learning from the beth israel hospital staff, when this younger tsarnaev dzhokhar tsarnaev was taken last week to this prison medical facility in deven devens, massachusetts, 40 miles from where i'm standing. but i want to begin with the wife of brother, tamerlan tsarnaev. her name is katherine russell. she has been questioned by investigators. we at cnn would love to talk to her. we're hearing a little bit from her attorney and we have seen some action today outside of her parents' home in rhode island. we want to begin this hour with erin mcpike in rhode island for us right now. erin tell me what you've been seeing today. >> reporter: well brooke about 12:30 today there were six fbi officials sitting in two cars outside katie russell's house. and just a russell's attorney two of them pulled up parked in katie russell's driveway and went inside her house. two minutes late five of those six fbi officials went inside katie russell's houseleft. so fbi officials have been inside katie russell's parent's house for the last hour and 20 minutes. now, of course we don't know
officer. you just need the right professional to help you take charge. ♪ >>> all right, today israel is asserting there is evidence the syrian government repeatedly used chemical weapons last month. britain and france are backing up israel's story. question, has syria crossed the obama red line? here now we bring in our friend, syndicated radio talk show host john bachelor, steve mcmann, guy benson still with me. great to see you. >> good evening, larry. >> who is right, who is wrong? britain backs up israel, france backs up israel. united states secretary kerry and hagel say there is no evidence. who is right, who is wrong? >> my information is there is no conclusive medical evidence that a lethal chemical weapon or anything as damaging as sarin, which was implicated in the report from israel from a conference was used. no conclusive medical evidence. there is soil sample that points to sarin. there is no explanation why that was used. in the march 19th incident, the chief victims were the regime's own soldiers. so while the assad regime remains bloody-minded, not this time, larry.
is if the syrian regime tries to exchange chemical weapons to terrorists in lebanon, particularly hezbollah, israel will react. we're sticking by that red line. the people in syria know that. the chemical weapons situation again is very, very complex. this is an american call. the united states and israel are sovereign countries. we've got to make our own decisions, whether about syria or the iranian nuclear program. >> here's the issue. it's not just syria that's watching. it's iran that's watching. president obama has said he would not allow iran to develop a nuclear capability, which is an intelligence matter, i don't have to tell you is a much more difficult thing to assess whether or not there's been a use of chemical weapons, if the president obama backs off from his red line, enormous consequences in syria, what's the lesson being seen by the mullahs in tehran? >> first of all, the syrian chemical threat is serious, threatens syria and other middle eastern countries. another threat is the existence of israel, and threatens world stability. the iranian mullahs, if they're looking at the syria
with israel. john kerry said relations between the countries are important for regional stability. he also in pea-sized turkey's role in aiding the syrian opposition and refugees. both by allies to the united states. we're hopeful that the agreement to restore normalization will help to open the door to greater cooperation and so that we can all work together to promote peace and be part of the peace process of foreign minister referred to. >> our correspondent is live in istanbul. it seems like a lot is being put on the shoulders of turkey. how prominent does the u.s. want turkey to be in the peace process? >> you get an indication from what you heard john kerry say of the importance the u.s. government seemed to be putting on developing turkey's diplomatic role in the region and the importance it attaches to turkey and israel preparing their relations. this visit comes following the phone call broken by barack obama between israeli prime minister and the turkish prime minister. in that phone call, and yahoo apologized for the israeli military raid on the turkish putin. the turkish foreig
. still to come, it is called the iron dome but is the israel defense system all that it is cracked up to be? e will report on the debate. indian police have a second man under arrest over the rape of a 5-year-old girl last week but that hasn't stopped protesters calling for the police to step down. there are accusations the victim's parents were offered a police bribe. the little girl was attacked in a locked room for more than 48 hours. she was rescued by neighbors that heard her crying. >> a fresh wave of protests after the latest horrific case of sexual abuse. the police had their hands full keeping the crowd at bay, much of the anger directed at the authorities. many here believe not enough has been done to protect india's women despite it being a burning issue for months. >> the government is always saying that we will do something but nothing has happened. that is why this time we have to do something and the government has to take action. >> at this hospital the child is still in intensive care recovering from her ordeal. after she was abducted and assaulted over two days. two
secretary has reiterated the u.s. .ommitment to israel's security jon kay geomet israel's prime minister on tuesday. they have been discussing the terms terms of a multibillion- dollar arms deals. -- chuck hagel visited the prime minister on tuesday. >> israel appreciates deeply the support, the military and security support, that it enjoys from the united states. it reflects a very deep alliance between our two countries in the defense of our common interests and values. nowhere are these values and interests challenged more than by the arming of the terrorist groups by iran with sophisticated weapons. equally, iran los attempt to arm itself with nuclear weapons. >> a palestinian prisoner has agreed to in his hunger strike in exchange for an early release. samer issawi has been refusing food for the past eight months. the strike has led to weeks of protest against israel detention policies. he was due to remain and prison until 2029 but will now be released this year. for more on this, let's go live to ramallah. that's between member of the palestinian prisoners organization. welcome to
. >>> and what will israel do? joining us today, israel's ambassador to the united states, michael orrin. >>> lockup -- the surviving boston bombing suspect is moved to a federal prison overnight. >>> and the suspect's carjack victim reveals new details about his terrifying and daring escape. >>> on this vote, the yeas are 361, the nays are 41, 0 recorded as present. two-thirds being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed. >> just in time for yet another congressional getaway -- and their flight plans, which had been in jeopardy, congress breaks all speed records overnight. ending the air traffic control sequester cuts. just wondering, what exactly is the holiday causing another week-long recess? and would they act this quickly so that 4-year-olds could get back to head start? >> good day, i'm andrea mitchell live in washington. the white house has confirmed that preliminary evidence of chemical weapons used in syria. so what are the next steps? how foreign affairs chairman ed royce has just attended a briefing by secretary of state kerry and joins me from the hi
into israel, so they cannot even practice speaking hebrew, that they can read it, and watch and listen to israeli television and radio. many older palestinian men who used to work in israel before the siege know about israeli society and can speak hebrew. now, the next generation is learning, too. generation is also learning to get a better understanding of their neighbors culture and religion. their teacher studied in israel in the years before gaza was sealed off. >> hebrew is a language like arabic. i would like to improve studies in gaza and establish my own research center. asked the government of hamas is behind the push for hebrew across the strip, even offering night classes to members. >> we live close to the border and the enemy enters a lot here at the young people used to hear israeli soldier speaking in hebrew, and in the future they want to know what they are talking about. it has been more than 10 years since hebrew was taught so widely here, but with gaza under siege there is little chance these children will be able to enter israel to speak it. >> power has been knocke
questions. israel has now called on hamas to rein in fighters accused of firing rockets on wednesday. the military says rockets landed in the south of israel. no one was hurt. it was a day after israel launched its first air strike on gaza in four months. the autopsy on a palestinian protester -- prisoner who died has been completed. the body will be transferred to east jerusalem work palestinians will carry out their own post- mortem. the death has raised tensions across the west bank. here where the burial will take place thursday. protesters were there on tuesday. palestinian prisoners continuing their protests in is really jails. he was serving a life sentence for his role in the attempted bombing of a cafe in jerusalem 11 years ago. palestinians say israel did not provide him with adequate care. day, noe end of the matter what. we also have complained about the palestinian authority and the palestinian government for not following up on his case, especially after we found out about this. i would not say we blame them, but they have to be questioned for that. where have they been
an iranian bomb would threaten the very existence of israel when barack does not. moreover, i'm not sure what it means to quote ensure that the option military strikes remain credible and go. given the ramifications of an attack that would delay but not even prevent an iranian bomb, i doubt that the u.s. hitting first with unilateral prevent an attack can ever be very credible. and constant repeating the military option is on the table won't make it so. thank you. >> thank you, greg. as i said everyone takes away from this report what they will anyone has contributed various things i think you for this and did comments. ali? >> good morning. thank you for the atlantic council for inviting me to speak. i also would like to talk about the consequences, the possible consequences of an iran armed nuclear weapons. let's assume that iran has managed to develop nuclear weapons and the simple nuclear weapons. there's several reasons cited as to why we should prevent iran from developing nuclear weapons, and that should be the primary u.s. goal. one of the reasons is that would inflict a blow to the n
that is backwards. they hear that israel made a strategic strike on a particular person or a particular target, and that was responded to with rockets. that is the way it's reported most of the time. when in fact the rockets have been going there -- there have been over 12,000 rockets in the last ten years, and some of them are small. made in grandma's garage. but a lot of them nor longer small. a lot of iranian or larger missiles that are not just what they call rockets which are small. these people have to get up and run everytime there is a siren, and they do it because they know they can be killed and people are killed, whether they're killed in great numbers, it depends on where it strikes. but these people were taking antidepressants, the children in the area were all bed-wetters. the people i went to see were being bussed to a lot for a three-day weekend so they could sleep in a hotel where there was no disturbance. these are old people. they don't want to leave there, but one said to me, how can you come sneer my children won't come and visit. aren't you afraid to be sneer and there we
extraordinarily negative impacts on the united states, european allies, israel and the system and the market defeat for the west. our task force recommends the obama administration layout a step-by-step reciprocal and proportional plan trading graduated sanctions for verifiable curbs on iran's nuclear program and verifiable assurances that iran does not have undeclared nuclear materials and facilities. iran should also explain past and possibly ongoing work on weaponization. our proposal would allow iran to continue to enrich uranium at a level provider confidence can be established that it's their nuclear program is exclusively peaceful. in a city or two u.n. security council resolutions, fully cooperate with iaea inspect various and nuclear site. if a deal cannot be reached or arranged expect more sanctions and covert action. it remains an option to deter iran from building nuclear weapons. indeed, the task force concluded, and i quote, the obama had in frustration must assure the threat remains credible as it may be the only course that deters a rant from to build nuclear weapons. even as
beginning. we are live at beth israel hospital in boston. adam, police say the suspect is in serious condition tonight. >> yeah, we hear the same thing, very serious condition. they are not giving us a lot of information. we are getting some bits and pieces from the hospital here that he is in surgery right now, he has multiple injuries. we know one of the injuries is a gunshot. we don't know if that's a serious one, self-inflicked, from the officers, all answers will come ii time, but we know at this hour they are doing what they can inside the hospital to ensure the suspect lives. we're told, as of right now, they believe he will make it through, again, they have not got into detail what they are doing, but we know he's right now in surgery with multiple injuries, at least one of the injuries is a gunshot, and at this hour, they say he should be making it at this point barring any change in the condition, of course. >> it's our understanding, among other things, a shot to the head and hand, guessing security's mighty tight. >> yeah. we heard the same thing, shot to the head nd han
of turkey. >> turkey and israel relations are very important for the whole region, because the region itself is going through a historical transformation process, like egypt, tunisia, yemen are trying to change, and also syria is in a very, very difficult situation. >> and the last thi that you would nt to see in the region is the turkish and israel relations getting worse. >> rose: american foreign policy, and turkish foreign policy when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders. n't and by bloomberg, a provider of multimedia news and information services worldwide. >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: richard haass is here, she the president of the council on foreign relations. he is a veteran observer of american foreign policy in his new book he looks inward and argues america must solve its domestic problems if it is going to be a foreign power, it is foreign policy begins as home, the case for putting america's house in order. i am pleased to have him here at this table.
and the eastern mediterranean, especially if their discoveries off the coast of cyprus and israel. in israel and cyprus alone, noble has discovered more than nine trillion cubic feet of natural gas over the past two years. this is not cheap natural gas. the price is much higher over there. it's not glutted like in our markets. a playoff the coast of israel, which everybody talks about, noble might have as much as 17 trillion cubic feet of gas and there could be huge upside if the israelis he of them permission to export the stuff. the company has to get permission from the israeli parliament. i'm thinking they would pull this off knowing that they have a specialist in middle east policy who also used to work for the state department. noble's gas might be the key that allows europe -- this is really important because there is a big geopolitical angle, allow europe to break its addiction to russian natural gas. writenow russia has a choke hold on your up but if noble partners with turkey you could see an instant revaluation upwards as turkey can pipe it right through to central europe. it mig
to beth israel hospital in serious condition. listen to this. >> the citizens of the city of boston and this area can be confident that the threat has been removed. >> a short time later, residents pouring out of their homes. cheering police in their vehicles as they rolled away from the scene. what a tense few days of events for them. chants breaking out of "usa, usa." >>> well, it was one of the most compelling images from the capture of tsarnaev and that is a picture of him in and ambulance covered in blood right there. this morning,esque treated as we said at beth israel hospital in boston. that's where adam housley is live with the latest. adam? >> reporter: yeah, heather. we saw some of the same scenes driving through the city over to this hospital after we learned he was being taken here. we followed authorities over to this direction. as you drove through boston, you could see the people coming out of the streets. in fact, at one point about 500 college students had shut down one of the streets in boston, cheering as first responders drove by. others had to turn away. then w
-armed iran would have extraordinarily negative impacts on the united states, its european allies com, israel, and the international system. it would mark a defeat for the west. our task force recommends that the obama administration layout step-by-step reciprocal and proportional plan, trading graduated relief of sanctions for verifiable curbs on iran's nuclear program, and verifiable assurances that iran does not have undeclared nuclear materials at facility. iran should also explain fast and possibly ongoing work on weaponization. our proposal would allow iran to continue to enrich uranium at a low level, provided that confidence can be established that its nuclear program is exclusively peaceful. it must adhere to all u.n. security council resolutions, fully cooperate with iaea inspectors at all their nuclear sites. if a deal cannot be reached, iran should expect more sanctions and covert action. military forces as a last resort but it remains an action to deter iran from building nuclear weapons. indeed, the task force included and ago, the obama administration must assure this threat re
? >> and that's so true and so frustrating, and in the next class we'll look specifically at israel because we had the opportunity to go there. and how incredibly complex, because on one hand, from the zionist movement, israel is a secular state. but how do jewish people define their identity, they're so diverse? well, it's usually through religion. and so even within israel, that creates a tension. i mean, is it possible outside of the monastery for people to live up to the highest ideals that we want to look at in the ethical dimension. and here we're thinking about in judaism and christianity the ten commandments or the eightfold path in buddhism, or any of the ideals, the precepts in religions- but how hard it is. >> my friend who's jewish said that she feels that it's- the people in that area do get along well; it's just strictly the government and that that's causing- you know, they get along well in their private lives, but the other thing enters into it and causes the whole situation, the havoc and the killing and such. >> and i've experienced that personally in a number of instances,
to bring them back to the negotiating table. 200,000 holocaust survivors live in israel. >> there is a new initiative to use smartphones to connect a younger generation to victims. for many israelis, it is also touching a raw nerve. >> israel stands still to remember 6 million murdered jews. at the university campus, a new kind of remembrance is taking place. volunteers from an ad agency handout temporary tattoos with id numbers that were once given to real holocaust victims in non-see -- nazi concentration camps. >> every year, holocaust survivors pass away. we want to create connection between the survivor still with us and their stories and the young people from today. they are the ones who have to carry on the memories of what happened. >> each number has a corresponding barcode that can be scanned onto a smart phone to learn more about the person and the story behind the number. this is abraham, an auschwitz survivor who lost his family there. >> [speaking foreign language] >> it means a lot to me and it is very moving. the good thing is that the campaign is oriented towards our lives
in israel nearly died in a series of attacks. this week the court sentenced american-borne john titel for those attacks. >> reporter: jack titel walked into the jerusalem courtroom unrepentant. the judge responded with two life sentences in two murder cases and an additional 30 years for other crimes. >> we hope that this heavy punishments will deter an any others who might think of doing any kind of terror activities or participating in such. >> reporter: tetel's reign of terror involved killing two pastors. it nearly killed 15-year-old ami ortiz. merchant yomiraculously, he survived. during sentencing, the judge said his holy work had become dust under his feet, and his actions contradicted the values of the jewish state. part of his mission included irradicating jews who believe jesus is the jewish messiah. >> the lord has, in his mercy, has chosen us to suffer for his namesake. and his name should are lifted up, because that's the only thing we can take with us, only jesus. >> reporter: lea ortiz says from the very beginning god told her to pray for the man who tried to kill her s
for palestinian independence or statehood and that is all that israel will and american presidents have tried including president obama and failed to push beyond that. i'm afraid secretary carey will push the rock down that road and that is not a road that can lead to real just a sustainable settlement. ,> isn't this just realpolitik at the moment, the issue of israeli-palestinian relations are fairly low on the white house's agenda. >> we're in washington. no one thinks long-term. every -- everyone knows it is a terrible thing for the u.s. to be this biased in favor of israel. there is no place for people did not think the u.s. should do more to solve this. it is in the long-term interests of the u.s. but short-term you're right. many -- there are many other more urgent issues including with those -- dealing with the latest crisis. >> even in the context of the middle east to do not hear very much about the issue of middle east peace process is because there's not much of a peace process but they are more focused on iran, they're focused on syria and the aftermath of the arab spring. >> ther
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